My Best Friend – Dora Imelda Porras

It was in the summer July 1988 when my best friend Ivette and her family visited Mexico. It was a beautiful, hot morning. My mother came to wake me up, and she said “Dora, Ivette is here!” I cleaned my teeth, face and brushed my wild, curly hair. I picked a new outfit; it was a white shirt with bright orange and green flowers on the bottom. I decided to wear a matching white skirt with a new pair of white sneakers. I looked at the mirror with a smile on my face. I kissed myself on the cheek.

I ran to her house. The house was nearby an old abandoned church. My skin had goosebumps all over every time that I passed by, but I controlled myself and ran faster. Finally, I was there knocking on the door, and there she was with her black short hair and wide smile. She was a foot taller than I was, and she said. “Hi shorty how are you?” I replied “Happy to see you again. You are grown up taller and thin, in the last three years.” That day we talked, laughed and hugged each other. I felt close to her, and we were like sisters.

The next day, we were walking at the main plaza El Jardin. The plaza was full of shops, restaurants, and blossom red roses. The chirping birds were a magical moment, and at each corner were the newsstands where you could find the outside news. One of my favorite hobbies was to check the headlines of the magazines. On the side that I never noticed was a lady selling American chocolates. Ivette bought one, she shared the chocolate with me. That was my first time tasting a delicious American chocolate. My mouth enjoyed the delightful flavor. That particular moment is when we began our conversation. Ivette said, “Do you like it?” I said, “Yes, it is exquisite!” Ivette replied “In America it is different. The schools are bigger with a lot of friends.” I asked “Do you see cutie guys like the ones in the magazines?” She responded “Oh yes a lot of them.” I exclaimed “WOOOOW! and then she suddenly asked me, “Do you want to come with us to The United States?” I responded “Can I go?’ She said, “Of course you can come! Let’s go to ask my mom. You can learn English, and come back to obtain a job in a big city.” Just the idea of knowing a different culture and language was the most amazing plan. That night, I was dreaming how fun it was going to be. She asked her parents and my parents.

Three months later, I was living in a different country with a strange family. The school had a cold feeling. I felt isolated; no friends, and classmates were bullying me. I perceived myself as a prisoner trapped in a different world. Ivette was acting strange, and her mother was even worse. I had to wake up early before school to clean the house. After school, I cooked for everyone. Weekends were laundry days. I cried every night because nothing was like the fantasy of what I dreamed about it.

I lived there for two long years. I was frustrated, mad, sad, lonely, and felt used. I learned to think twice before make any decisions, asked questions, and help when you need it. Communicate with parents or relatives especially when it sounds too good to be true. Do not believe in strangers.

It was in the summer July 1988 when my best friend Ivette and her family visited Mexico. It was a beautiful, hot morning. My mother came to wake me up, and she said “Dora, Ivette is here!” I cleaned my teeth, face and brushed my wild, curly hair. I picked a new outfit; it was a white shirt with bright orange and green flowers on the bottom. I decided to wear a matching white skirt with a new pair of white sneakers. I looked at the mirror with a smile on my face. I kissed myself on the cheek. I ran to her house. The house was nearby an old abandoned church. My skin had goosebumps all over every time that I passed by, but I controlled myself and ran faster. Finally, I was there knocking on the door, and there she was with her black short hair and wide smile. She was a foot taller than I was, and she said. “Hi shorty how are you?” I replied “Happy to see you again. You are grown up taller and thin, in the last three years.” That day we talked, laughed and hugged each other. I felt close to her, and we were like sisters. The next day, we were walking at the main plaza El Jardin. The plaza was full of shops, restaurants, and blossom red roses. The chirping birds were a magical moment, and at each corner were the newsstands where you could find the outside news. One of my favorite hobbies was to check the headlines of the magazines. On the side that I never noticed was a lady selling American chocolates. Ivette bought one, she shared the chocolate with me. That was my first time tasting a delicious American chocolate. My mouth enjoyed the delightful flavor. That particular moment is when we began our conversation. Ivette said, “Do you like it?” I said, “Yes, it is exquisite!” Ivette replied “In America it is different. The schools are bigger with a lot of friends.” I asked “Do you see cutie guys like the ones in the magazines?” She responded “Oh yes a lot of them.” I exclaimed “WOOOOW! and then she suddenly asked me, “Do you want to come with us to The United States?” I responded “Can I go?’ She said, “Of course you can come! Let’s go to ask my mom. You can learn English, and come back to obtain a job in a big city.” Just the idea of knowing a different culture and language was the most amazing plan. That night, I was dreaming how fun it was going to be. She asked her parents and my parents. Three months later, I was living in a different country with a strange family. The school had a cold feeling. I felt isolated; no friends, and classmates were bullying me. I perceived myself as a prisoner trapped in a different world. Ivette was acting strange, and her mother was even worse. I had to wake up early before school to clean the house. After school, I cooked for everyone. Weekends were laundry days. I cried every night because nothing was like the fantasy of what I dreamed about it. I lived there for two long years. I was frustrated, mad, sad, lonely, and felt used. I learned to think twice before make any decisions, asked questions, and help when you need it. Communicate with parents or relatives especially when it sounds too good to be true. Do not believe in strangers.

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